Monthly Archives: November 2017

My Cat Ate a Mouse – Should I Be Worried?

Cat with mouse in it's mouthCats are natural predators of rodents. Some cats are particularly obsessive about mouse hunting. For many years, many people kept cats or fed outdoor cats because our feline friends are so good at catching mice.

Today it is much more common for people to keep their cats indoors full time. Just because your cat is an indoor cat doesn’t mean it won’t get a chance to catch a mouse. Mice will move indoors during the fall and if you have a cat, it’s likely they will be hunting for him.

This leads people to wonder:
If my cat eats a mouse, will he get sick? Should I let my cat eat mice?

 

If you want to be safe, you really shouldn’t let your cat eat mice. Your cat could eat a mouse and not get sick, but it’s possible they could contract a disease from mice.

Cat BoredomDiseases mice can give cats:

  • Toxoplasmosis
  • Intestinal Worms
  • Hantavirus
  • Rickettsialpox

Eating a mouse could cause your cat to be infected by one of these diseases. 

Toxoplasma can make your cat sick and can cause various symptoms ranging from diarrhea, pneumonia, liver disease, or diseases of the nervous system. This disease can also spread from your cat to you!

Roundworms are a common intestinal parasite that a cat can get from eating a mouse. Roundworms can live in your cat’s intestines and compete for nutrients they would normally ingest.

Hantavirus can quickly progress into acute respiratory distress and pulmonary edema. It can also be spread to humans as well, although symptoms may not show for weeks. 

Rickettsialpox causes ulceration of the area surrounding the mite bite, fever, and a rash over the body and limbs.

Another danger your cats face is that they can eat a mouse that has already ingested poison. The poison that will kill a mouse may also make your cat sick and even endanger their life.

The safest option is to not let your cat eat mice. Of course, that’s not always possible.

What to do if my cat eats a mouse?

Since you don’t know how your cat will react or if the mouse was diseased, you must carefully monitor your cat’s behavior and health for anything out of the ordinary. Watch for any symptoms such as vomiting, diarrhea, or abnormal behavior. If you notice any symptoms, contact your veterinarian immediately.

If you don’t see any unusual symptoms but are still worried, call your vet’s office for advice. Better to be safe because early treatment is very important.

Related: 9 Weird Cat Behaviors Explained


The Pet’s Home provides in-home pet sittingdog sittingcat sittingdog walkingpuppy training and pet taxi services in the Plainfield, Oswego, Naperville and Shorewood area. 

Contact us online or call (630) 854-8841


Cat image by Stig Nygaard


 

Using Baking Soda to Fight Dog Odors

Arm and Hammer Baking Soda for dog odorsDid you know that good old-fashioned baking soda can help you fight dog odors?

This common and affordable household product can be used for cleaning many things in your home, but we’ll discuss how you can use it to eliminate pet odors.

It is a natural cleaner and deodorizer that doesn’t contain harsh chemicals.

Dry shampoo your dog with baking soda

When you don’t have the time or energy to give your dog a bath, you can give them a quick “dry shampoo” with baking soda.

  1. Make sure your dog is completely dry.
  2. Brush your dog to remove loose hair.
  3. Lightly sprinkle baking soda across your dog’s coat, avoiding the face.
  4. Lightly rub the baking soda in and leave it in for 5-10 minutes.
  5. Use a brush and a towel to remove excess baking soda.

Wet shampoo your dog with baking soda

Many dog shampoos contain baking soda already. You can make your own DIY dog shampoo with odor neutralizer by mixing mix one tablespoon of baking soda with 1.5 cups of warm water. Wash your dog with the mixture and gently massage it into their coat.

You can also make a baking soda and water rinse to use after you have used your normal dog shampoo. This gives your dog a very thoroughly clean and will remove excess shampoo from your dog, which may cause itchiness.

Related: How to clean your dog’s teeth

Use baking soda on a dog bed, furniture or carpeting

Sometimes that spot where your dog loves to lie down can smell a little bit too much like a dog after a while.  Sprinkle baking soda on carpeting, furniture, or the dog bed, then leave it in for about 20 mins and then vacuum it up. 

Baking soda to deodorize your car

You can also use baking soda to eliminate dog odors in your car. Sprinkle it on the seats and floor mats and give it a few minutes to absorb odors and then vacuum it up. 

Clean up “dog accidents” on carpeting

You can use baking soda to clean up a spot on the carpeting when a dog has an accident. First, try and blot up as much of the liquid as you can with a rag or cloth first. Then mix equal parts white vinegar and baking soda to create a runny paste-like substance. Apply the mixture to the soiled carpet or furniture, let it sit for a few minutes to absorb odor and then wipe or sponge it up.

Get rid of skunk smell

The old cure of using tomato sauce to get rid of the smell when your dog gets sprayed by a skunk just isn’t very effective. Instead, get out your reliable box of baking soda, and mix a ¼ cup baking soda with a teaspoon of liquid dish soap and 1 quart of 3% hydrogen peroxide. Rub the mixture onto your dog, leave it on for five minutes and then rinse thoroughly. You may need to clean them with this once or twice to finally get that smell out.

Is baking soda poisonous to dogs? 

An important note: Baking soda is considered non-toxic to humans but that doesn’t mean it is safe for dogs to eat. You can brush your dog’s teeth using baking soda but larger amounts can be dangerous. Baking soda is a leavening agent. If combined with the heat found in your dog’s stomach, it will release gasses that can cause low potassium, low calcium, high sodium, muscle spasms and even heart failure. If your dog eats baking soda, call your veterinarian immediately. 


The Pet’s Home provides in-home pet sitting, dog sitting, cat sitting, dog walkingpuppy training and pet taxi services in the Plainfield, Oswego, Naperville and Shorewood area. 

Contact us online or call (630) 854-8841