Help Your Pet Avoid Heat Stress This Summer

Keep pets cool

Temperatures are already heating up around here, and were definitely finding it the perfect cure after these last few weeks of rain. But are your pets enjoying the heat? It’s very important for pet owners to be aware of the risk of heat stress in your pets.

Certain breeds are more prone to suffering from heat stress, like Bulldogs, Pugs and Persians, because of their long coats and short snouts. It’s important to implement measures to keep your pet cool on hot days, as heat stroke can be life threatening.

How to Avoid Heat Stress

Unlike humans, who are able to sweat to loose heat, dogs and cats cannot regulate their temperature in this way and rely mainly on panting and external cooling to lose heat from their bodies. This limits their ability to regulate their body temperature, which is why pet owners need to take action to minimize the risk of heat stress.

Some things you can do include:

  • Ensuring your pet has access to shade when outside, and the freedom to move into shaded areas;
  • Ensuring your pet has access to fresh drinking water inside and outside the house (ensure they are placed in a shady spot if outside and consider placing an extra bowl or two if you are leaving the house;
  • Avoiding excessive exercise/ avoiding exercise during the hot parts of the day/avoiding exercise entirely on very hot days;
  • Not leaving pets in the car, even with the windows open.

Signs of Heat Stress in your Pet

Being aware of signs of heatstroke may allow you to act quickly and prevent internal organ damage. These signs may include:

  • Excessive panting progressing to breathing distress;
  • Drooling, salivation
  • Very red or very pale gums;
  • Vomiting and/or diarrhea
  • Restlessness, delirium, agitation, 
  • Seizures
  • Collapse/comatose

What to do if your suspect your pet has heat stress?

If your concerned that your pet it suffering from heat stress, remove your pet from the hot environment, wrap him or her in a wet towel or spray him or her with cool water onto the skin and fan to maximize heat loss and take home into your nearest veterinarian as soon as possible.

Protect your dog from Mosquitoes

It’s almost summer, but to us dog owners we know what season really is almost here: flea/tick/mosquito season. It’s that time of the year when you become wary of letting you dog walk through ominous-looking grass and uncut lawns. After all, mosquito bites carry deadly consequences and can transmit diseases like heart-worm and West Nile. But if encasing your dog in a protective, impenetrable bubble doesn’t work for you, here are some ways to keep your dog sage and bite-free all summer.

Whatever you do, DON’T use human insect repellent on your dog.Mosquito Protection-Dog

Human bug sprays are great for us, but they’re toxic for our furry friends. Deet, the main ingredient in most drugstore bug sprays, can cause vomiting, seizures, and skin irritation when exposed to dogs.

When applying bug spray, make sure your dog doesn’t lick your skin, if they do, contact your vet immediately.

Avoid leaving standing water around your home.

Mosquitoes, much like humans, need water to live. Restricting their access to water is the best way to keep adult mosquitoes from breeding and, thus, unleashing more mosquitoes into your home.
To prevent this, eliminate any standing water around your home. You might also want to empty your dog’s water bowl at night when you know they won’t be drinking it.

Don’t walk your dog at peak mosquito times.

Just like how us humans have rush hours, mosquitoes have their own time of the day when they’re the most active, and those times are at dawn and dusk. Avoid walking your dog during these hours and they’ll be less likely to be bitten.

Buy insect-repellent products made for dogs.

Fairly self-explanatory, but stick to products that are made for dogs. That way you know they’re safe to use. Most flea and tick products are formulated to repel mosquitoes as well.
K9 Advantix and Bio Spot are two examples of great triple action products that should keep your dog free of bites all summer long. You can also buy sprays and other insect repellents from your pet store.

Don’t ignore natural remedies.Mosquito Protection-Dog

If you’re not comfortable using chemicals on yourself, let alone your dog, there are lots of natural remedies for mosquito prevention that work just as well as the chemical ones. Lemon eucalyptus oil is an effective repellent that keeps mosquitoes at with its repugnant smell.

Geranium oil and soybean oil when mixed together can also be used as a repellent. Although you can find products with these ingredients in health food stores, you can also mix together these oils yourself and make your own D.I.Y bug spray.

Fix any broken window screens in your home.

Most mosquitoes get into the home through open windows or broken window screens. If you wake up with new bites on your arms, your windows might not be protecting you and your dog as much as you think.

Be wary of any holes or tears in screens that might be letting bugs in. And don’t forget to fill in the gap between the air conditioner and the window frame, too.

Internet Cat Video Festival Features Best Cat Videos

Internet Cat Video Festival

Do you love cat videos?

Of course you do!

Our research shows that 125% of internet users enjoy watching cat videos online. We were surprised the number was that low.

Since everyone loves cat videos then that means that everyone would be interested in the Internet Cat Video Festival. 

The Internet Cat Video Festival is described by its organizers as “the first offline celebration of online cat videos”.

The live event was held from 2013-2016 and gathered cat fans in a social environment to watch a curated collection of funny cat videos ranging from six-second videos to short films and everything in between.

Related: Cats and Cucumbers

The festival began as an event held at the Walker Art Center in St. Paul, Minnesota in 2013 but grew into a touring event in cities across the United States and even internationally to Ireland, Japan and Australia. 

After the 2016 festival, the Walker Art Center announced it was discontinuing the festival in order to pursue new projects.

The Walker donated its archive of related cat-themed ephemera to the Minnesota Historical Society and hopes others will be inspired to create copy-“cat” events of their own.

Related: 9 Weird Cat Behaviors Explained

The Internet Cat Video Festival did come to Chicago in 2013, 2014 and 2015, but if you weren’t able to attend, you can enjoy 60 Things I Learned At The 2013 Internet Cat Video Film Festival on Buzzfeed and watch a few selected Internet Cat Video Festival videos at Animal Planet.

Tips for Leaving Your Dog on Vacation

For many dog owners, leaving on vacation becomes a cause for anxiety when thinking about leaving your dog behind while you are gone.

We like to take our dog with us when possible but sometimes that just can’t be done. The logistics of the situation just won’t allow it. You might be going somewhere too difficult to take your dog or it could even be an unwelcome or even unsafe situation for them.

We’ve created a list of tips to help you out in this stressful situation with the hope that it makes things a little easier for you.

Chances are you’ll be more worried than your furry friend is so please try and have fun while you’re away.

Make sure your dog has up to date ID tags

We’re sure that you’re going to leave your do in the best hands possible but even then sometimes things happen. Make sure your dog has its tag with correct contact information on it.

Leave detailed instructions

Make sure your caretaker can get in touch with you and that they know what to do should any situation arise and you aren’t reachable. Be specific on how much food your dog gets for each meal, and how many treats they get. If they need medicine, leave instructions for how much they need to take and how to give it to them. 

Related: Pet sitting vs pet boarding

Keep in touch

Since we have tools such as Skype or Facetime, make a video call to check in on your dog. This always helps me out because I love the look on by dog’s face when she hears my voice. Her ears will perk up and I’ll get to see she’s okay and the warm feeling when she reacts to seeing me.

Make sure they’re aware of your dog’s behaviors

All dogs have they’re own quirks and behaviors that you manage without having to think about it too much. Your caretaker, however, will need to know if you’re dog will become a savage beast at the sight of a squirrel. Make sure they’re aware.

Leave comforting items for your dog

Perhaps you can leave a t-shirt in your dog’s crate so they can be comforted by your scent. Maybe you can leave special treats with them. Maybe if they’re being dog sat at their own home you can leave a radio on if they’re not used to the sound of an empty house. 

Related: The Advantages of a Pet Sitter Over Boarding

Don’t turn your goodbye into an event

If your dog is used to being left alone every day when you go to work, try keeping a similar routine. An unusual emotional goodbye may leave them feeling anxious. It may not be easy for you but you want to leave your pet feeling as relaxed and normal as possible.

Leave your dog in good hands

You can’t make it so that your dog is never sad or emotional. You can, however, make sure they are in a safe place where they will be well cared for. Leave your pet with someone you trust, whether it is a dog sitter or a pet boarding service. 

Know your dog loves you

We have never seen a case where a pet forgot who their owner is. Even the pets who enjoy the adventure of boarding with other pets and love their caretaker will still love their owner. Nothing will change that.

Stray Dog Adopted by Monastery, Becomes Friar and Internet Sensation

Carmelo the "Friar Pup"

Have you heard about Carmelo, the newest online animal sensation?

Carmelo, (also known as Friar Bigotón) was a stray who was adopted by the St Francis Monastery of Cochabamba, Bolivia. 

The monastery announced that the furry pup, whom they have named Carmelo, has joined their fold. He has even been given a habit to wear just like the rest of the friars.

“His life is all about playing and running. Here, all of the brothers love him very much. He is a creature of God” said friar Jorge Fernandez.

St Francis, who the monastery is named after is the patron saint of animals, so it was only natural for them to adopt this dog. They wanted to set an example for others to open their homes to animals in need.

Related: Three questions to consider when choosing a new pet

As often happens, the cute little animal has taken social media by storm, with millions of people sharing and commenting on photos of Carmelo. He’s even gained worldwide coverage from national media networks.

Carmelo’s adoption became possible through the Cochabamba, Bolivia animal rescue group Proyecto Narices Frías (Cold Nose Project).

They wrote on Facebook, “If all the churches of our country adopted just one dog and cared for it like Friar Bigotón, we are sure that the parishioners would follow this excellent example.”

It’s safe to assume that their example has worked and that many of Carmelo’s millions of fans have adopted other pets.

Related Post: Tips for the first 30 days of dog adoption

 

Is Your Cat Bored?

Take a look around your home. Are there things that your cat can do, play with and watch?

Kitty boredom can lead to a variety of problems and destructive behaviors such as:

  • Urinating outside the litter box
  • Overeating
  • Aggression
  • Scratching

Preventing Cat Boredom

It is important to provide your cat with a stimulating environment. This means an environment with things to do. Windows to look out of, things to watch, places to climb and safe toys to play with are all great ways to prevent boredom.

Here are some tips to entertain your cat and prevent undesirable behavior:
Cat Boredom

  1. Catnip – Cats LOVE catnip. Offer your cat some catnip on occasion to roll around in and eat. You can also revive interest in an old cat toy by sprinkling it with catnip.
  2. Window Perches – Cats enjoy having a comfortable place to watch what is going on outside. Purchase a window bed for your cat or position a cat tree near a window to create an outside view.
  3. Create an Outside View – Position a bird or squirrel feeder within viewing distance of your cat’s window perch.
  4. Cat Toys – Make sure that you are stocked with plenty of cat toys. Hiding and then reintroducing toys that your cat enjoys is a great way to keep them interested.
  5. Scratching Post – Even a declawed cat will enjoy scratching post. It’s an instinctive behavior that cats never lose. The scratching post should be tall enough that your cat should be able to really stretch when using it.
  6. Your Time –Take at least 10 minutes out of your day to play with your cat or allow them to curl up with you.

Keep in mind that behavioral problems can be caused by many things. Be sure to take your cat for regular checkups and vaccinations. A healthy kitty is a happy kitty.

Tips for the first 30 days of Dog Adoption

The first few days in your home are special and critical for a pet.

Your new dog will be confused about where he is and what to expect from you.

Setting up some clear structure with your family for your dog will be paramount in making as smooth a transition as possible.

BEFORE YOU BRING YOUR PET HOME

 

  • Determine where your dog will be spending most of his time. Because he will be under a lot of stress with the change of environment (from shelter or foster home to your house), he may forget any housebreaking (if any) he’s learned. Often a kitchen will work best for easy clean-up.
  • If you plan on crate training your dog, be sure to have a crate set-up and ready to go for when you bring your new dog home.
  • Dog-proof the area where your pooch will spend most of his time during the first few months. This may mean taping loose electrical cords to baseboards; storing household chemicals on high shelves; removing plants, rugs, and breakables; setting up the crate, and installing baby gates.
  • Training your dog will start the first moment you have him. Take time to create a vocabulary list everyone will use when giving your dog directions. This will help prevent confusion and help your dog learn his commands more quickly.
  • Bring an ID tag with your phone number on it with you when you pick up your dog so that he has an extra measure of safety for the ride home and the first few uneasy days. If he is microchipped, be sure to register your contact information with the chip’s company, if the rescue or shelter did not already do so.

Related: Rules of thumb in positive reinforcement

First Day:

  • We know moving is stressful — and your new dog feels the same way! Give him time to acclimate to your home and family before introducing him to strangers. Make sure children know how to approach the dog without overwhelming him.
  • When you pick up your dog, remember to ask what and when he was fed. Replicate that schedule for at least the first few days to avoid gastric distress. If you wish to switch to a different brand, do so over a period of about a week by adding one part new food to three parts of the old for several days; then switch to half new food, half old, and then one part old to three parts new.
  • On the way home, your dog should be safely secured, preferably in a crate. Some dogs find car trips stressful, so having him in a safe place will make the trip home easier on him and you.
  • Once home, take him to his toileting area immediately and spend a good amount of time with him so he will get used to the area and relieve himself. Even if your dog does relieve himself during this time, be prepared for accidents. Coming into a new home with new people, new smells and new sounds can throw even the most housebroken dog off-track, so be ready just in case.
  • If you plan on crate training your dog, leave the crate open so that he can go in whenever he feels like it in case he gets overwhelmed.
  • From there, start your schedule of feeding, toileting and play/exercise. From Day One, your dog will need family time and brief periods of solitary confinement. Don’t give in and comfort him if he whines when left alone. Instead, give him attention for good behavior, such as chewing on a toy or resting quietly.
  • For the first few days, remain calm and quiet around your dog, limiting too much excitement (such as the dog park or neighborhood children). Not only will this allow your dog to settle in easier, it will give you more one-on-one time to get to know him and his likes/dislikes.
  • If he came from another home, objects like leashes, hands, rolled up newspapers and magazines, feet, chairs and sticks are just some of the pieces of “training equipment” that may have been used on this dog. Words like “come here” and “lie down” may bring forth a reaction other than the one you expect.Or maybe he led a sheltered life and was never socialized to children or sidewalk activity. This dog may be the product of a never-ending series of scrambled communications and unreal expectations that will require patience on your part.

Related: How much exercise does your dog need

Following Weeks:

  • People often say they don’t see their dog’s true personality until several weeks after adoption. Your dog may be a bit uneasy at first as he gets to know you. Be patient and understanding while also keeping to the schedule you intend to maintain for feeding, walks, etc. This schedule will show your dog what is expected of him as well as what he can expect from you.
  • After discussing it with your veterinarian to ensure your dog has all the necessary vaccines, you may wish to take your dog to group training classes or the dog park. Pay close attention to your dog’s body language to be sure he’s having a good time — and is not fearful or a dog park bully.
  • To have a long and happy life together with your dog, stick to the original schedule you created, ensuring your dog always has the food, potty time and attention he needs. You’ll be bonded in no time!
  • If you encounter behavior issues you are unfamiliar with, ask your veterinarian for a trainer recommendation. Select a trainer who uses positive-reinforcement techniques to help you and your dog overcome these behavior obstacles.Congratulations! If you follow these tips, you’ll be on your way to having a well-adjusted canine family member.

SOURCE: http://www.zalaw.com/images/happy-dog.jpg

SOURCE: https://www.petfinder.com/dogs/bringing-a-dog-home/tips-for-first-30-days-dog/


 

Does Your Dog Need a Winter Coat or Boots?

When winter winds come whistling, I’m the first to don a heavy overcoat, a knit hat and boots — and my dogs aren’t far behind. It’s a common misconception that dogs, equipped by nature with fur coats and a higher body temperature than humans, will do just fine in cold weather without accessories such as sweaters, coats and booties. That might be true for hardy sled dogs who spend their days in training for the Iditarod, but I can assure you that dogs with short or thin coats or those with certain size or health limitations need just as much protection from the cold as you or I do. Here’s what you need to know about dressing your dog for winter.

Coat Check
Dogs with short, thin or fine coats feel the cold quickly — but that doesn’t mean that your pooch needs to bundle up every time he leaves the house. If your dog is going outdoors for a quick potty outing and coming right back inside, no need to wrestle him into a sweater or coat and booties. The same is true if you’re going for a brisk walk. Chris Zink, DVM, a canine sports medicine authority, says dogs who are exercising continuously shouldn’t need a coat because they create their own heat.

But if that brisk walk takes your thin-coated dog through the snow, or if he’ll be running through areas where ground water could splash up and freeze on him, then a coat or sweater is a good idea. Dr. Zink also recommends protecting certain sensitive body parts — some coats made for field dogs provide coverage of the penis and testicles.

Dogs who spend time outdoors but aren’t consistently active during that time can benefit from a sweater or coat to help them conserve body heat. For these dogs, I recommend a lightweight sweater or coat that won’t restrict your pooch’s front-leg movement. We (my dogs and I) are big fans of Fido Fleece. Have a couple on hand so your dog will always have a dry one to wear; putting a damp coat or sweater on will just make him colder.

Bassets, Dachshunds, Corgis and other small dogs may lose heat more quickly because their low stature or small body size puts them in closer contact with snow. Other dogs who may appreciate the comfort of a coat include pets with Cushing’s disease, diabetes, or heart or kidney disease. Their health conditions may make it more difficult for them to regulate their body temperature. Young puppies and old dogs are also more susceptible to chills. And even if your dog has a long or thick coat, he’s not made to spend hours outdoors in below-freezing weather without protection.

Finally, remember that while a coat can keep your dog warm, it can make it difficult or impossible for him to escape if he falls through ice into water. Avoid situations where that could happen.

To Shoe or Not to Shoe
What about those paws? Do dogs really need booties? That’s a matter of opinion. Some dogs can benefit from them, especially if they have furry feet that collect ice and snow between the toes, but fit is super important.

Booties should be comfortable, without rubbing against the dog’s paws, and of course they need to actually stay on. Dr. Zink says booties are most important for sled dogs running long distances, dogs walking on surfaces covered with salt or ice melter, which can be toxic, and dogs with hairy paws that collect snowballs. Be prepared to try out lots of booties until you find the ones that are right for your dog’s tootsies.

If you can’t find booties that fit well, or if your dog flat-out refuses to wear them, you can take other steps to protect his paws. As soon as he comes inside, soak his paws for a few seconds in a bowl of warm water, then dry them thoroughly. (If he’s a little guy, wipe down his legs and belly too.) You can also trim the fur between his toes to help reduce or prevent the accumulation of ice and snow there, which can cut the feet or cause your dog to limp. Help prevent cracked and bleeding paw pads by applying petroleum jelly or paw wax before your dog goes outside.

POST SOURCE: VetStreet
IMAGE SOURCE: KURGO

Benefits of Using Our Pet Taxi Service

One of the best reasons Pet Taxi helps you and your pet, is making it to scheduled appointments at the veterinarian , groomer, airport, etc…, Knowing that your pet is in caring, loving hands.

The Pets Home http://thepetshome.com/ provides the best pet taxi services for your pet.  We provide comfortable and safe pet transportation at an affordable price. Our professional pet taxi carriers are trained and licensed in pet care services. We will pick-up and/ or drop off. Cats must be crated. Dogs will be walked prior to the trip. Crates will be provided per pet .

Benefits of Pet Taxi Services: Pet taxi service from The Pet's Home
For Your Pet:

Making it to scheduled appointments
Maintaining medical treatment when required
Receiving love and personal attention
Provides socialization with person outside the family
Having someone responsible in case of emergency

For you :

Knowing that your pet in caring , loving hands
Not having to impose on family , friends or neighbors
Discreet , personalized service

Why Pet Taxi Service?

Pet owners can not always adjust their schedule or be available when their pet needs to attend an appointment at the veterinarian , groomer, etc..
Sometimes the owner is ill or injured and unable to transport their pet to a scheduled appointment. When these situations occur, you have an option of using us to transport your pet.
Your pet will travel in an air-conditioned vehicle that is well maintained and fully insured.

Pet Taxi Services available:
Transportation,… one way or round trip
Fresh water
Waiting for pet
Treat feeding (if allowed )

The Pets Home can make sure that your pet is taken care of, call today.(630) 854-8841

SOURCE: http://www.bluepawpetcare.com/services/ 

IMAGE:  https://sittersforcritters.com/pet-taxi-transport-in-philadelphia-bucks-county/

How To Train Your Dog

Life with a well-behaved dog has its rewards. You can trust him to respond reliably and quickly, plus you’ll have a dog who’s a joy to live with.

Why Training Is Important

34989

Training is not cruel and unusual punishment. It actually enhances the relationship with your dog and enriches the bond you establish with him throughout the years. Once he understands what you expect of him, you will get along much better. During the training process, you’ll learn to decipher his language and he’ll figure out what it is you’re trying to tell him.

Training takes practice, and the more time and effort you put into the process, the more you will get out of it. If this is your first dog—and even if it isn’t—you may want to consider hiring a private trainer or think about signing up for a training class. Puppies usually start out in puppy kindergarten. After that you can join an obedience class for older puppies. Ask how many dogs are already signed up before committing to attending. Class size for puppies should be limited to eight to ten dog-and-handler teams per instructor. This ratio enables the instructor to give each team enough attention and time to respond to questions or special training circumstances.

During class your puppy will learn some basics, such as sit, come, down, stay, and how to walk nicely on a leash. These elementary lessons with an instructor and other class participants will teach you the fundamentals of dog training while benefiting from others’ trials and tribulations.

Teaching your dog how to behave involves more than saying his name followed by giving him a command, followed by a little piece of food. Effective training involves interpreting canine body language, anticipating the dog’s responses, timing the rewards, and varying the rewards to keep him motivated to act appropriately.

The Importance of Positive Training

Your dog will respond to your direction if you make it fun. Animal behaviorists believe that the old ways of punishments and harsh corrections may work once or twice, but they are often inhumane, and in the long run, ineffective. Your dog will not understand why you are angry with him, and you can’t expect him to choose a different action the next time.           

A year-long study by the University of Pennsylvania, ending in 2009 and published in the journal Applied Animal Behavior Science (Elsevier), showed that aggressive dogs who were trained with aggressive, confrontational, or aversive training techniques, such as being stared at, growled at, rolled onto their backs, or hit, continued their aggressive ways. Non-aversive training methods, such as exercise or rewards, were very successful in reducing or eliminating aggressive responses.

Positive training lets your dog know that you are pleased with him, and he will repeat that behavior the next time. Rewards can consist of food, toys, or petting. Depending on what your dog does, you can use one, two, or all three types of rewards. You can also use playtime and games as positive reinforcement. The idea is to reward him every time he does it right. But once he knows it, reward him with food, toys,  or petting only some of the time (but always verbally praise him every time). This way he’ll work hard to please you, hoping that he’ll receive a reward.

How to Get Started

Begin teaching your dog good manners a few days after he’s had a chance to settle into the household.

Keep Training Sessions Short

Keep your training lessons short—about 10 to 15 minutes at each session. You can repeat the session later on in the same day, but each one should be brief. Plan to engage in several training sessions a day because no puppy learns to do something perfectly in only one take.

Use Small Food Treats

It’s a good idea to feed some small food treats as rewards for training. You can use soft commercial food treats sized for puppies, pieces of string cheese, or small pieces of cut-up hot dog that he can swallow right away. Avoid hard, crunchy treats because they take a while to chew. Give treats to your puppy immediately—within half a second of him completing the desired behavior. The faster you confirm the behavior you want, the easier it is for your puppy to understand what you’re trying to teach him. When you give the reward, follow it up by saying “Good boy!”

Avoid the trap of handing out treats during a training session just because your puppy looks cute. He will work harder to please you if he knows that he’s getting a reward than if he hasn’t earned it. If he doesn’t do something you like, don’t yell or punish. Simply withhold the reward.

Say a Cue Word Only Once

Say a cue word, like “sit” or “down,” only once. Dogs are smart, so they hear your command and can follow it the first time. Repeating the cue word multiple times doesn’t help your pup sharpen his listening skills, and like a teenager, he’ll tune you out.

Schedule Training Before Meals

Schedule your training session before your dog’s regular meal. This way he may pay closer attention to the instructions so that he can earn a tasty bite.

Choose a Training Time With no Distractions

Choose a time for training when no one will interrupt you and you don’t feel rushed. Turn your cell phone off and forget about answering the doorbell if it rings. This will give you quality time to devote to the training process.

For the first few sessions, pick a room in the house that’s large enough to move around. When your dog figures out what you want him to do, take your training lessons outside, preferably to a fenced-in area, or keep him on a leash when you are in an unfenced area. Distractions will vie for your puppy’s attention, so you’ll need to become more interesting than the street noise, a fast-moving squirrel, or the scent of newly mowed grass.          

Don’t Train When Puppy’s not in the Mood

Don’t train your puppy when he’s hot, tired, or in the middle of vigorous playtime. You want him energetic and eager for a training session.    

Don’t Get Angry With Your Puppy

If you ever become frustrated with your puppy, don’t get angry with him. Just quietly end the session and try again later in the day. Some dogs have soft temperaments, and they become nervous and will stop paying attention to their trainers if they are yelled at. They can become scared of any training and decide that following directions is not for them. Stay calm and relaxed so that your puppy will learn in a positive environment.

Call the Pets Home @ (630) 854-8841 for quality, professional sitting services.

The Pet’s Home is pleased to offer dog training services including disobedient dog training, doggy day camp training, and our most used service: puppy training. Our goal is to help your pet learn new skills that you’ll be able to implement at home. We aim to teach pet parents break their own bad habits, as well. This allows your pet to have consistency and eliminate confusion between training.

We are available to train your beloved pet at your home or ours for one-on-one sessions. Your dog may be dropped off prior to services or we offer shuttle services to pick up your pet. The Pet’s Home is available to travel to our entire service area for one-on-one training.

POST & IMAGE SOURCE: NYLABONE