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5 Dangerous Houseplants that are Toxic to Dogs

Houseplants Toxic to Dogs

Houseplants have many benefits in the home. They make a home cozier, can be used for medicinal purposes and purify the air. Unfortunately, there are some fairly common houseplants that can be dangerous to your dog. In this post, we will review some houseplants that are toxic to dogs.

Poisoning from these plants can occur in several ways such as:

  • Drinking the water from the plant tray or pot.
  • Eating the leaves, blossoms, roots or even the soil in the pot.
  • Skin contact with any plant sap or juice.

Before you purchase any houseplant protect your canine family member by doing a little bit of research.

Related: Plants That Are Poisonous to Cats

1. Philodendron
Philodendron

Philodendrons are very popular houseplants. They are fast growing, available in climbing and upright varieties and are easy to care for. These plants contain insoluble calcium oxalates which are toxic to animals and humans.

Symptoms of Ingestion: Oral irritation, pain and swelling of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, difficulty swallowing.

2. Pothos or Devils Ivy
Pothos (Devils Ivy)

The Pothos Houseplant has amazing air purification properties and is easy to propagate from cuttings which makes it a very popular houseplant. Though only mildly harmful in small quantities, Pothos also contains insoluble calcium oxalates.

Symptoms of Ingestion: Oral irritation, pain and swelling of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, difficulty swallowing.

3. Peace Lily
Peace Lily

Containing insoluble calcium oxalates like Philodendrons and Pothos houseplants, the Peace Lily can be moderately harmful to your dog.

Symptoms of Ingestion: Drooling, pawing at the mouth, oral pain, decreased appetite, vomiting.

4. Aloe Plant
Aloe Plant

Aloe is a very common household plant due to its medicinal benefits such as purifying the air and is also provides natural burn/sunburn relief. For dogs though this plant should be kept out of reach as it contains saponins and anthraquinones.

Symptoms of Ingestion: Vomiting, abdominal pain, hypersalivation, diarrhea. Foliage is more toxic than berries.

5. Ivy or English Ivy
English Ivy

Ivy is a beautiful accent to your home with the way it cascades from hanging baskets but is very harmful to your pet especially if consumed in large amounts. Beware.

Symptoms of Ingestion: Vomiting, depression, anorexia, changes in urine color, and rarely, tremors.
 
 


If you suspect your pet may have ingested a potentially toxic substance, call the APCC at (888) 426-4435 or contact your local veterinarian as soon as possible.

Sources:
The ASPCA
Pet Poison Helpline


The Pet’s Home provides in-home pet sitting, dog sitting, cat sitting, dog walkingpuppy training andpet taxi services in the Plainfield, Oswego, Aurora, Naperville, Joliet and Shorewood area.

Contact us online or call (630) 854-8841


How to Introduce a Dog to Cats

Dog and Cat introduction

If you already are the proud pet-parent of a cat and are now thinking about adding a dog to your family, planning for their introduction should be something you think about.

Dogs and cats can and often do live together peacefully under the same roof.  It just takes some planning, patience, and guidance on your part.

With pets, like humans, first impressions can be important. A poor introduction between your dog and cat could set up the pattern for future interactions. Things won’t always go well the first time but if you can keep the situation from turning into a worst-case scenario, you will be making it easier for all involved.

Plan ahead, have a strategy and take your time. Don’t rush their meeting, even though you will be tempted. 

 

The difference between puppies and adult dogs

Dog barkingIntroducing a puppy to cats will usually be easier than introducing an adult dog. Puppies can still learn behaviors and one that grows up around cats will be more likely to see them as part of his pack.

 

Know their personalities ahead of time

As you know, different pets have different personalities. Some dogs and cats will just never get along, while others have the personalities to be tolerant, or even happy with each other.

Don’t try to force an introduction when your instincts are telling you it won’t work. Some dogs are just too aggressive towards any cat. Some cats will not tolerate a dog entering its territory. Some dogs just love to chase, and matching them up with a shy cat could be a bad decision. 

Before the introduction, your dog should be well-trained, and responsive to the commands to come, stay, and sit.

 

How to introduce a dog to a cat

Cat restingBefore the first introduction, make sure your dog has been fed and had a good exercise session. 

For the safety of your cat, there should be a safe getaway space in every room. This could be an area blocked off with a baby gate or even just a shelf or high spot that your cat can get to but the dog cannot. 

Let your dog and cat meet each other the first time by smell only. Give them a chance to become familiar be scent before they physically see each other.

Put your cat in a safe area, and let your dog roam the house for around 30 minutes. This will allow the dog a chance to “meet” your cat by smell only at first. Afterward, take your dog out for a walk and let your cat roam around and “meet” the dog by smell only.

Over a few days, rotate which animal has freedom and which is confined to a certain area to allow each animal plenty of time to investigate the other one’s scent.

The first time you introduce them, allow both animals to be in the same room at the same time, but keep your dog on a leash this time.

Your cat’s first reaction may be to hiss and run away. This is a normal reaction for cats.

Dog chewingContinue keeping them separated with this type of introduction until your dog is able to remain calm and ignore the cat, and your cat is calm, eating and using their litter box normally.

If they still show fear and aggression towards each other, go back again to keeping them in separate rooms only able to smell and be aware of each other.

All of the initial interactions should be while your dog is on a leash. Keep the litter box in a safe area and do the same with their food as well. 

They should spend at least a few weeks and maybe as long as a month having only supervised interactions. They should only have unsupervised time together when you are fairly certain that they will not hurt each other. 

 

Sometimes, despite your best efforts, some relationships aren’t meant to be. Some dogs are just too dangerous to be around cats. If instincts tell you that this meeting won’t work out, respect that message. It’s better for all involved.

 


The Pet’s Home provides in-home pet sittingdog sittingcat sittingdog walkingpuppy training and pet taxi services in the Plainfield, Oswego, Aurora, Naperville, Joliet and Shorewood 


 

Dog and cat introduction resources: 

Introducing Dogs to Cats – American Humane
How to Introduce Your New Dog to Your Resident Cats – The Spruce
How to introduce a dog and cat – Animal Humane Society
Introducing Your New Dog to Your Resident Cat – Reach Out Rescue

Dog Sprayed by Skunk? Here’s What to Do and What Not To

skunks spray dogs

Taking care of your furry friends has many “ups”, but also a few “downs”.

One of the worst problems you may have to deal with is when your dog was outside and it comes to your door, wildly howling and barking.

You go to check what is wrong with her and you notice something right away…. THE SMELL.

Oh no. Not that smell. Your dog has been sprayed by a skunk. AHHHHHH!

In this post, we tell you what to do when your dog has been sprayed by a skunk, and give you a recipe for cleaning the skunk smell off of your dog. We also tell you a few things not to do.

 

Skunk FestWhat to do when your dog is sprayed by a skunk

  • Keep your dog outside until they are clean.
  • Check and rinse your dog’s eyes immediately.
  • Don’t cuddle your dog until after you’ve cleaned them.
  • Clean your dog as soon as possible. The sooner the better.
  • Mix your dog cleaning solution.
  • Wash and shampoo your dog.

 

Keep your dog outside of your living space until she is cleaned. 

If your dog has just been sprayed, you will want to keep them out of your home. We’ve heard plenty of stories about panicked dogs running through the home, rolling on the carpet, jumping on couches, and spreading skunk smell to everything they touch.

Don’t give yourself an even bigger mess to clean up! Keep them outside or in the garage. People sometimes bring them in the basement, and then regret that when the scent wafts through the ceiling to every room on the first floor

 

Trance Faced With Guilt Animal Cute Dog Daze

Check your dog’s eyes immediately. If the eyes appear red or irritated, be sure to flush them immediately with cool water. You cannot use the same cleaning solution that you’ll use to clean their fur on their face.

 

Don’t cuddle your dog until they are clean. Your dog may be upset but we don’t recommend giving them a hug right now. The oil from the skunk and the smell are very easy to transfer to almost anything they touch.

 

Clean your dog as soon as possible. The longer the skunk spray is on your dog, the harder it will be to remove. 

 

Mix your dog cleaning solution. The old tale of using tomato sauce to clean your dog after it was sprayed by a skunk is just a myth. 

Skunk spray removal recipe for dogs

Here is an easy skunk smell removal recipe that really works:

  • 1-quart hydrogen peroxide (3%)
  • 1/4 cup baking soda (sodium bicarbonate)
  • 1 teaspoon liquid dish soap (for example Dawn dish soap)

Mix these three ingredients together in a large bowl or bucket. Once mixed, thoroughly rub it into your pet’s fur. Let it soak in for five minutes and then rinse it out with tap water. Don’t leave it in for longer or it may cause bleaching.

It’s likely that you may have to repeat this cleaning process a few more time to get rid of the smell.

After you rinsed them with the smell removal mixture, wash your pet as you normally would with pet shampoo and conditioner.

 

What not to do when your dog is sprayed by a skunk

  • Don’t let your dog inside your living areas.
  • Don’t let your dog on carpet or furniture.
  • Don’t use any towels you don’t want to ruin.
  • Don’t wash your dog with tomato sauce.
  • Don’t use a hydrogen peroxide solution stronger than 3%.
  • Don’t get the cleaning solution in your dog’s eyes.
  • Don’t mix your skunk smell removal mixture ahead of time. It can lose it’s potency and could potentially become explosive.

We hope these tips help you out when you’re in a stinky situation!

 


The Pet’s Home provides in-home pet sittingdog sittingcat sittingdog walkingpuppy training and pet taxi services in the Plainfield, Oswego, Aurora, Naperville, Joliet and Shorewood area. 

Contact us online or call (630) 854-8841


Other outdoor dog threats:
Dogs and Ticks
Dog Sunburns
Common dog parasites
Protect your dog from mosquitos
How to stop your dog from digging
Does your dog need winter coats or boots?


Plants That Are Poisonous to Cats

Cat outside - avoid poisonous plants

In this post, we review a list of common plants and flowers with photos that can be poisonous to your cat. Protect your cat and remove these from your home.

Cats, like dogs, will sometimes chew or eat house and garden plants. Some of these plants could make them sick. Others could even be fatal.

If you believe your cat may have eaten a toxic plant, call ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center Phone Number: (888) 426-4435

 

What plants are poisonous to cats?

  • Ivy
  • Pothos
  • Philodendron
  • Kalanchoe
  • Lilies
  • Peace Lily
  • Spanish Thyme
  • Tulip Bulbs
  • Narcissus Bulbs
  • English Ivy
  • Autumn Crocus
  • Azaleas
  • Rhododendrons
  • Castor Bean
  • Chrysanthemum
  • Amaryllis
  • Kalanchoe
  • Oleander
  • Cyclamen
  • Sago Palm
  • Yew

 

Related: My Cat Ate a Mouse – Should I Be Worried?

Ivy

Ivy

You should avoid having ivy of all types in your home.

Pothos

Pothos vine plant

One of the most common types of ivy house plants, pathos, should be avoided.

Philodendron

Philodendron

The Philodendron plant is toxic to dogs and cats.

Kalanchoe

Kalanchoe

Kalanchoe may not kill your cat but it may make them nauseous and vomit.

Lilies

Lily

There are thousands of types of lilies, but you should keep them all away from your cat.

Related: Reasons to Keep Cats Indoors

Peace Lily

Peace Lily

A common lily that is often shared as a gift, keep the Peace Lily away from your cat. 

Spanish Thyme

Spanish Thyme - Coleus ampoinicus

Eating the Spanish Thyme will cause stomach upset and diarrhea.

Tulip Bulbs

Tulip Bulbs

Tulip bulbs contain toxins which can be poisonous to cats, dogs, and horses.

Related: Foods That Are Dangerous For Dogs

Daffodil (Narcissus) Bulbs

Daffodil bulb

Daffodils, for example, can cause stomach upsets, vomiting, or worse if your cat eats the foliage, flowers or pods.

English Ivy

English Ivy

English Ivy is a common outdoor plant that your cat should not eat.

Autumn Crocus

Autumn Crocus

The pollen, leaves, stems, and even water from the vase of these lilies can cause severe kidney failure in cats.

Rhododendrons

Rhododendrons

All parts of all types of the rhododendron are considered poisonous to both pets and humans.

Azaleas

Azaleas

Azaleas are a type of rhododendron and so are poisonous to pets and people.

Castor Bean

Castor Bean

The seeds of the castor bean plant are very toxic to dogs, cats, and horses.

Chrysanthemum

Chrysanthemum

Chrysanthemums are toxic to cats, dogs, and horses if they are ingested in high enough amounts.

Amaryllis

Amaryllis

Amaryllis plants are a type of lily, and lilies should be avoided.

Oleander

Oleander

All parts of the oleander shrub plant are poisonous to dogs, cats, humans, and horses.

Cyclamen

Cyclamen

 If ingested, this plant can cause increased salivation, vomiting, and diarrhea.

Sago Palm

Sago Palm

The leaves from the sago palm can cause severe damage to the liver.

Yew

Yew

All parts of the plant, including the foliage and succulent red berries, are toxic to cats.

 


The Pet’s Home provides in-home pet sittingdog sittingcat sittingdog walkingpuppy training and pet taxi services in the Plainfield, Oswego, Naperville and Shorewood area. 

Contact us online or call (630) 854-8841


Other poisonous plants for cats resources:
 

Toxic and Non-Toxic Plants List – ASPCA

Which plants are safe – and not safe – for cats? – Natural Cat Care

Poisonous Plants for Cats – Pet MD

Ten Household Plants That Are Dangerous/Toxic to Dogs and Cats – Vet Street

Keeping Your Pet Safe from the Poisonous Plants of Spring – Pet MD


 

How to Leave Your Dog Home Alone

Dog Home Alone

Is there a way to leave your dog home alone and not have to worry about your pet’s happiness?

Every dog owner will have to deal with leaving their dog home alone sometimes. As much as you love them, you have a job and other social obligations where you will have to leave your friend at home. 

In this post, we discuss tips to make your dog’s time at home safe and enriching, and how long you can leave a dog alone.

 

How to train your dog to be home alone

 
Dog chewingStart separation training right away – Even though it’s going to be hard, it is best to start training your dog to be home alone from the time you get them. You don’t want them to become too dependent on your company.

Get your dog a soft bed or crate, plenty of water, and a favorite toy. Head to another room with no fanfare while he is content playing. Start with a few minutes and gradually increase the time. Hold off opening the door if you hear him whining, crying, or barking. When he is quiet, you can enter the room and give brief praise. Slowly start adding short trips outside the house to the routine, following the same steps.

Related: Tips for the first 30 days of dog adoption

Treats – A special treat should be given only when you are leaving and not when you return. Your puppy may even learn to enjoy when you are preparing to leave for work, knowing that a treat is on the way.

Stay calm – You don’t want to make leaving too big of a production because that can actually add to their anxiety. The ten minutes before and after a separation should be serene and matter-of-fact. It may be hard to not give them giant special hugs and attention before leaving or right when you return, but it will be best for your dog.  When you return, hold off on the special attention until your dog is fully settled down.

Exercise before leaving – Make time to either play games or go for a walk before leaving. A dog that has had the chance to spend their excess energy will be less likely to get into trouble or be stressed. 

Related: How much exercise does your dog need?

Create a routine – Separations will be much easier if you have a regular schedule or routine. Consistent times for meals, playtime, and walks will have a calming effect on your dog. Maintaining a schedule will also make easier for a friend or dog-sitter to help you out when you’re not around.

Related: Tips for leaving your dog on vacation

All dogs are different, and some can handle more time at home alone than others.

Every dog needs bathroom breaks, exercise, and mental stimulation. By taking care of these needs, you will be able to make separation much easier.

 

How to leave your puppy home alone

 

How long can my dog go between bathroom breaks?

According to experts, dogs will usually need to pee between three to five times a day. The timing of potty breaks varies from dog to dog, and puppies and older dogs will need more bathroom breaks.

Here are common time limits for dogs of different life stages:

  • Puppies – One hour per every month of age (so three-month-old puppy can wait three hours to pee.)
  • Adult dogs – Age one year and up: up to eight hours, but ideally no more than six.
  • Senior dogs – Age eight and up: depending on size and health, anywhere from two to six hours.

 


The Pet’s Home provides in-home pet sitting, dog sitting, cat sittingdog walkingpuppy training and pet taxi services in the Plainfield, Oswego, Aurora, Naperville, Joliet and Shorewood area. 

Contact us online or call (630) 854-8841


More Resources:

How Long Can You Leave a Dog Alone? – Daily Treat

How Often Do Dogs Need Bathroom Breaks? – Paw Print Blog

How To Leave Your Dog Home Alone – Petcube

How to Leave Your Dog Home Alone and Happy – Orvis


 

How to Travel in a Car With a Cat

Cat in pet carrier

In this post, we discuss tips on how to travel in a car with a cat so that you can make the experience easier for you and your pet.

There will be times where you will need to transport your cat with you in your car. The problem is, unlike dogs, cats are not well known for enjoying rides in the car.

Cats do not travel well. They enjoy their routines and the safety of their home and territory. Cats don’t like changes.

If you’re just going on a vacation, we don’t recommend that you even try to take your cat with you. Cat sitting services are well suited to your cat, who will enjoy the safety of her familiar territory and in-home pet sitting

 

Why Cats Hate Cars

Cat BoredomFor starters, most cats have very bad associations with cars. Their first and often only experiences with cars are usually unpleasant.

Their first experience in a car is usually when they are taken away from the only home they’ve ever known.

The second is usually being taken to the vet. And often, that’s the only experiences they’ll have. Nothing about them make your cat want to go on another car ride.

The challenge is to help your cat build a more positive association with your car. You will have to spend some time conditioning them to associate your car with positive experiences.

 

Tips for Car Travel with a Cat

Your cat should always travel inside a pet carrier while in a car. A cat roaming around in the car is a distraction to the driver and can be dangerous. An accident could send your cat flying or get them crushed by an airbag. Crate train your cat ahead of any planned trips.

Related: My cat ate a mouse, should I worry?

Make sure your cat has identification in case they make a quick escape from the car. You might think you’ll be able to stop them or they won’t try to run but you would feel very bad if that happened and your cat would likely be terrified as well.

Allow your cat to wander around and rub their scent in the car before a trip. Before doing this, move their bed or a toy or favorite blanket into the car so it gives them something familiar. Get inside the car with your cat, close the door, and let him sniff and explore for five minutes before taking them back into the home. Do this five-minute car visit a couple times a day for a few days before leaving on a trip.

Related: 9 Weird cat behaviors explained

When your cat is starting to appear more comfortable in the car, give them a few meals in the car, or offer high-quality treats that your cat wouldn’t normally receive. If your cat is a big fan of catnip, you can use that as well. You want to begin having them associate special things with being in the car.

You should introduce the pet carrier when your cat has shown that they are becoming more comfortable in the car. Set it the carrier on the back seat and start the car. Then turn off the motor and get out without going anywhere. You should repeat this a few times a day until they are used to this activity. Give them a reward when it’s time to get out of the car.

Related: How to get your cat to use a litter box

Eventually, you should be able to back the car to the end of the driveway with your cat inside. Do this two or three times in a row, and then let them out after your return. If your cat shows signs of stress, you may need to slow it down a little. This can take awhile. When they are used to a trip to the end of the driveway, expand it to a trip around the block and then after that, around the neighborhood.

 


The Pet’s Home provides in-home pet sitting, dog sitting, cat sitting, dog walkingpuppy training and pet taxi services in the Plainfield, Oswego, Naperville and Shorewood area. 

Contact us online or call (630) 854-8841


How to Stop Your Dog from Digging

Dog digging in yard - how to stop

So how do you get your dog to stop digging? In this post, we’ll discuss the reasons that some dogs dig, the breeds most likely to dig, and the methods you can use to discourage the behavior.

Digging in the yard is common issue dog owners face because, for many of them, it’s instinctual behavior. Some breeds are especially prone to digging because they were originally bred for hunting.

Whether your dog is digging up your yard because of instincts or boredom, you’re probably not going to be happy about it once your yard is full of holes.

 

Why do dogs dig?

Dogs can dig in the yard for a variety of reasons, the most common being they’re bored or aren’t getting enough exercise and playtime.

  • Dogs favorite personBoredom
  • Exercise
  • Excess Energy
  • Comfort Seeking
  • Separation Anxiety
  • Hiding Possessions
  • Escape or Gain Access
  • Attention Seeking
  • Entertainment
  • Hunting Prey
  • Instinct

When your dog digs up the yard, it can definitely be frustrating.  If you can figure out the cause of the digging, then you can take steps to stop it. Often times, it comes down to your dog having too much energy, which can mean they need more walking, exercise, playtime or toys that will help them use up energy in other ways. 

Related: How Much Exercise Does Your Dog Need?

 

How to stop dogs from digging?

If you can determine the reason your dog is digging, you’ll have a much easier time changing the behavior. You may need to try a few different things to find what works.

  • Give them more exercise and playtime
  • Get them more toys and new chew toys
  • Grant them an area it’s okay to dig in
  • Don’t leave them outside alone
  • Don’t leave toys outside
  • Create deterrents to digging
  • Help your dog cool off
  • Get rid of rodents

Related: Benefits of Positive Reinforcement Dog Training

Exercise and playtime – These are the most common methods to get your dog to stop digging in the yard. Very often the cause of the digging is related to lack of exercise or play. Keeping your dog from getting bored and making sure they have an outlet for their energy can go a long way to stop them from digging.

Give them new toys – Your dog may need some new diversions to keep them entertained. Try offering a wide assortment of toys, such as balls, sticks, rope toys, treat-dispensing dog toys and dental chews. Rotating through an assortment of toys can help keep them from getting bored.

Don’t leave toys outside – Some dogs feel the need to bury their possessions. If you leave chew toys, bones, or playthings outside, they may dig in an effort to hide them.

Give them a place it’s okay to dig – Consider creating a space that’s intentionally designed for your dog to dig in. Let them have a spot in the yard where they know they’re allowed to dig.

Don’t leave them outside alone – Some dogs if left unsupervised in the yard will entertain themselves by digging holes. You may have to make sure they are only in the yard when they are supervised.

Create deterrents for digging – Sometimes you can come up with ways to frustrate the digging behavior of your dog, and make it so it’s not worth their effort. Things like citrus sprays, coffee grounds, vinegar and even cayenne can stop dogs from digging in problem areas.

Help your dog stay cool – Some dogs will dig because they are hot, and digging below the surface gives them cool ground to lie on. Provide other ways for them to stay cool on hot days.

 

What dog breeds dig the most?

These dogs are most likely to dig because at some point it was their job and the behavior was rewarded and red into them.

  • DachshundDachshund
  • Bedlington Terrier
  • Cairn Terrier
  • Beagle
  • Miniature Schnauzer
  • Wirehaired Pointing Griffon
  • Siberian Husky
  • Alaskan Malamute
  • Australian Shepherd
  • Border Collies

 

More Dog Training Information

How to Stop Your Dog from Chewing – The Pets’ Home
How to Get Your Dog to Stop Barking – The Pets’ Home
How to Get Your Dog to Stop Digging – Humane Society
How to Stop Dogs from Digging – The Spruce
7 Tips to Stop Your Dog from Digging Up the Yard – Rover
10 Dogs Breeds That Love to Dig – Petcha

 

The Pets’ Home offers dog training services along with our popular dog walking and dog sitting services. You can get dog shuttle service available to and from training lessons. We also aim to teach pet parents how to break their own bad habits, as well, so your dog can have consistency. 

Contact us online or call (630) 854-8841

Is It Safe for My Cat to Eat Bugs?

Cat hunting bugs to eat

Domestic house cats are natural born hunters. It is in their genes and they share this trait with their much larger “cousins” in the big cat family.

As a cat owner, you’ve probably seen cats chase after anything that moves, from rodents to laser lights, to insects.

Most of us humans aren’t really into eating insects so it’s not surprising that we might be a little grossed out by seeing our cat eat a grasshopper or a moth.

You might even wonder:
Is it safe for my cat to eat bugs? Are insects poisonous to cats?

 

You shouldn’t have to worry. Most household insects are not harmful to your cat. There are some exceptions to this though.

Is it safe for cats to eat flies?

Cat restingIt’s okay for your cat to eat flies. If it lived out in the wild, it would probably be eating them anyway. House flies do not carry transmissible diseases and eating one occasionally is not going to hurt your cat.

Related: My Cat Ate a Mouse – Should I Be Worried?

Is it safe for cats to eat moths?

In most cases, it’s perfectly fine for your cat to eat moths. Many cat owners say their cats love moths and enjoy hunting for them in the summer. Some have said that the only moth that can make your cat sick is the Garden Tiger Moth. Even that one won’t kill your cat.

Is it safe for cats to eat June Bugs?

Cats love to chase June bugs, and some dogs enjoy eating them as well. While the bugs themselves are not toxic, eating too many of them can lead to an upset stomach, and possibly even diarrhea or vomiting.

Is it safe for cats to eat grasshoppers?

Besides moths, grasshoppers are often a favorite bug to eat for many cats. They present a fun challenge for your cat to hunt. They are usually harmless for your cat to eat, although too many of them could lead to an upset stomach.

Relate: Reasons to Keep Cats Indoors

Is it safe for cats to eat mosquitoes? 

Although mosquitoes can carry diseases which can be passed on to humans and animals, eating mosquitoes will not harm your cat. The bite of a mosquito is what can transfer a disease. The digestive process in the stomach will render diseases carried by mosquitoes harmless.

Is it safe for cats to eat centipedes?

House centipedes are predators who eat other bugs in the house, so they’re not harmful to have in the home. They are capable of biting humans, although they usually won’t. Their bit usually won’t make it through your cat’s fur though. They aren’t poisonous for your cat to eat. 


The Pet’s Home provides in-home pet sittingdog sittingcat sittingdog walkingpuppy training and pet taxi services in the Plainfield, Oswego, Naperville and Shorewood area. 

Contact us online or call (630) 854-8841


Photo credit: Cat stalking a prey photo by Jennifer Barnard is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

Cat Myths We Should Put to Rest

Cat resting

In this post, we address the most common of those myths that you hear about cats that are not actually true.

There are many things in the world we believe because we’ve heard them for so long, we assume them to be true. Many myths that people have about pets or animals are repeated so often, we never think to ask if they’re actually true.

Let’s review some common myths about cats and their behavior.

 

Cats are low maintenance

Because cats have a reputation for being so independent and aloof, some people think having a cat will be very easy. Like many pets though, owning one requires your commitment and attention. Cats need to be fed of course, but they also need to be loved, they need to be played with and entertained, and they need our help in getting their needs met. They require our understanding and patience sometimes too. 

 Related: Is Your Cat Bored?

 

Cats won’t be happy if you don’t let them outdoors

Indoor cats can be just as happy as outdoor cats. Cats that grow up inside can be very happy as long as you give them the entertainment they need. Provide them with plenty of toys, scratching posts, window they have access to for outdoor viewing and climbing towers. 

Related: Reasons to Keep Cats Indoors

 

Pregnant woman should not have cats

The truth is that you don’t have to get rid of your cat. It’s fine to be around cats when you’re pregnant, but you have to be VERY careful about cleaning the litter box. It is recommended that you have someone else do it if possible. Cat feces can carry a parasitic infection called toxoplasmosis, that could cause birth defects. Keep the litter box extra clean but the pregnant woman shouldn’t be the one cleaning it.

 

Declawing cats is no different than trimming nails

Declawing is NOT like trimming nails. In reality, it is actually the surgical amputation of the first joint of each toe of the cat. For many people and pet advocates, this procedure is viewed as mutilation of the cat. There are humane alternatives to declawing you can choose instead.

 


The Pet’s Home provides in-home pet sitting, dog sitting, cat sittingdog walkingpuppy training and pet taxi services in the Plainfield, Oswego, Naperville and Shorewood area. 

Contact us online or call (630) 854-8841


 

How to Stop Your Dog from Chewing

Dog chewing

Many dog owners have had to deal with coming home and discovering that your doggy friend has chewed on something she wasn’t supposed to have.

For puppies, chewing is a normal part of the teething process. When adult dog chew, they often do it out of boredom or stress. 

When your dog repeated engages in inappropriate chewing, it can be very frustrating as well as destructive to your property. It can also lead to medical problems and hurt the bond with your dog.

In this post, we look at steps you can take to stop your dog from chewing things that they shouldn’t and correct the behavior.

How to get your dog to stop inappropriate chewing

  • Puppy-proof your home
  • Rule out medical issues
  • Make sure it’s not separation anxiety
  • Encourage them to use a chew toy
  • Discourage inappropriate chewing
  • Use a dog chewing deterrent
  • Give them plenty of exercise

 

Puppy-proof your home

Make sure you remove items out of the reach of your dog that could be harmful. Start with electrical cords and household chemicals. Move on to your shoes, socks and kids toys that could be too tempting while your dog is still learning good behaviors. 

Prevent parasites in dogsRule out medical issues

Make sure that your dog does not have any medical problems which could lead to inappropriate chewing. Nutritional deficiencies, gastrointestinal problems, and parasites can trigger chewing as a coping mechanism for your dog. Make an appointment with your veterinarian to rule out underlying medical conditions that can lead to chewing.

Related: Using Baking Soda to Fight Dog Odors

Make sure it’s not separation anxiety

Sometimes excessive chewing can be a symptom of separation anxiety. If you believe this could be the cause, schedule an appointment with your veterinarian.

Related: Tips for Leaving Your Dog on Vacation

Encourage them to use a chew toy

You will need to encourage your dog to redirect their behavior to appropriate objects like chew toys. Every dog has their own preferences for what kind of toys they like, so you may need to try a few different types of toys before you find the right kind for your dog.

 

Discourage inappropriate chewing

If you catch your dog chewing on something they shouldn’t be, you need to correct the behavior right away.  Immediately take the object away and scold them. Direct their attention to one of their new chew toys and heap on the praise when they chew on it. Your dog will learn what objects are his and which are not.

 Related: How to Get Your Dog to Stop Barking

Use a dog chewing deterrent

You may need to purchase dog chew deterrent spray from your local pet store. You can use this on things your dog likes to chew on that you just can’t hide, such as the leg of a chair. One bite and your dog will hopefully decide he doesn’t want to chew that anymore.

Give them plenty of exercise

Make sure that you spend plenty of time playing and exercising with your dog. If you don’t already, schedule a regular play time. You need to try and use up all that energy that your dog might be putting into chewing behaviors. A tired dog doesn’t have the energy to misbehave.

 

The Pets’ Home offers dog training services along with our popular dog walking and dog sitting services. You can get dog shuttle service available to and from training lessons. We also aim to teach pet parents how to break their own bad habits, as well, so your dog can have consistency. 

Contact us online or call (630) 854-8841

 

More related sources:
5 steps to correct inappropriate dog chewing – Cesar’s Way
How To Stop Dogs From Destructive Chewing – Dog Time 
How to Stop a Dog from Chewing – American Kennel Club
Chewing: How to Stop Your Dog’s Gnawing Problem – Humane Society
Tips for How to Stop Dogs and Puppies from Chewing – Pet MD