Category Archives: Pet Care

daycare dog halloween

Daycare dog services and the joys of Halloween for all pets

Daycare dog services provide your dogs a loving home to visit. Boarding services tend to pick up around the holidays, so now is a good time to think about both daycare dog services and Halloween costumes!

Since daycare dog services tend to pickup around the holidays, it is a good idea to start planning ahead. Here at The Pets’ Home Day Care and Boarding, we will ensure your pet is safe, comfortable, and happy while you are away. We also offer you pet pick-up and drop-off services for busy parents, saving you time and adding convenience. All employees bonded, insured, trained in CPR and First Aid. 

Our daycare dog services include 

  • Five acres for exercise, play, and socialization
  • In-ground pool for play
  • Baby pools for smaller breeds
  • A multitude of toys for all ages and types of dogs.
  • We are bonded and insured
  • We are trained in first aid and CPR

Our facility is on 5 acres, 3 of which are fenced in, offering your pet room to run, play and socialize with the other guests.

The play areas are sectioned between small, medium and large dogs. Our in-ground pool offers fun, exercise, and socialization. Smaller pools are available for our petite guests.

We can administer all types of medicine your dog needs and The Pets’ Home is certified by the National Association of Pet Sitters (NAPPS).

Here are three picks for pet costumes of 2020:

Delivery service pet

A lot of us have likely been ordering more from online retailers in the recent months. We appreciate our delivery service workers and what better way to honor them than bringing them into our families through the costumes of our beloved pets?

Species transformation costume

Halloween is a time for fun! Transforming your pooch into a zebra, your cat into a fierce lion, or your guinea pig into a lobster sounds like a recipe for entertainment!

Time for dress-up costume

Would you like to see your pet look fancy? Make this Halloween a time to play dress-up. Add extravagant accessories, exaggerated superhero capes, or anything else wildly ridiculous.

Just make sure your pet is comfortable wearing it! 

dog daycare

Dog daycare and other Pet Care tips for the Fall season

Dog daycare and other pet care services including dog walking become busier around this time, so it is important to plan ahead in making arrangements for the fall. Not only do arrangements become busier in the fall, but we also see more school supplies! Many school items are considered low toxicity to pets, however, if ingested they could still gastrointestinal problems. Toxic markers, pencil sharpeners, glue. wire-bound notebooks, etc can also be hazards to pets.

Speaking of eating, when it comes to your pet’s own food, cooler temperatures may mean more food is required for energy to stay warm. Early in the season, your pet will start to shed their summer coat to allow room for the winter coat. Grooming your pet will help with the hair you find everywhere, as well as your pet’s health. The frequency of grooming will depend on your pet’s needs, but doing so will help with healthy skin, coat, ears and overall health. Drier air caused by heating can also impact pets, causing skin irritation, allergy flare-ups, and other discomfort.

Another cute aspect is bundling up for fall. Help make sure your pet is dry and warm. However, watch out for other negative signs as well. Pets can be effected when you turn on the furnace, particularly if their cages, crates, tanks, or aquariums may be near vents. Also watch out for signs of stiffness and other indicators of arthritis.

Dog daycare and boarding for the holidays

Dog care: how to camp with your canine

Thoughts on enjoying all that the outdoors has to offer through a camping trip with your dog can be exciting, but you’ll also want to make sure your dog is prepared for the trip. With a little planning, you’ll be able to make it a refreshing and safe adventure. Check out these tips below for dog care while camping.

Know your location

You’ll want to check on the restrictions for dogs in your location. Is your dog allowed on all parts of the site? Some parks and campgrounds even have pet restrictions due to migrating wildlife. In addition, researching your camping destination is recommended to check for toxic plants and wildlife that may dangerous to your dog.

How is your dog’s food supply?

Dog care for camping requires some of the same basics as a camping trip for people. Dogs should have the proper gear for camping. You can bring a lighter bowl that is easier to carry and will prevent from ruining their usual bowl. Carrying enough water and food will be necessary. Make sure all food is stored safely and remember extra treats to coax them to the dinner bowl if nerves make them less drawn to eat, or to grab their attention whenever a camping distraction takes over.

Health and safety

Part of your dog care will be making sure all of your dog’s shots are up to date and having a vaccination record on the trip. Pet medications, including flea and tick prevention medication, and dog bug spray are important. During the trip, your dog will likely be leashed, but your dog should have their collar with an ID tag on even if they’re microchipped. 

Additional items include a first-aid kit, poop bags, a dog towel and grooming brushes to keep your dog’s coat free of dirt, twigs and bugs, and boots for areas and conditions that may not be as dog-friendly.

Comfort for dog care

As much fun as your dog may be having on the trip, dogs also get attached to their daily routine and reminding them of home will help keep them happy. Bringing a blanket for sleep, favorite toy, their dog bed, and their favorite treats are all items that are recommended to bring.

Related:
https://thepetshome.com/dog-beach-tips/

 

How to Choose the Best Dog Food

Dog food dish - How to choose healthy dog food

In this post, we discuss some of the ways you can choose the best food for your dog to help you sort through all the choices and keep them healthy.

When you go shopping for food for your dog, there are just so many choices.

It doesn’t matter whether you’re at a pet store, superstore or convenience store, there are just so many brands and types of dog food.

With all the choices, how do you choose the best food for your dog?

 

What makes a “good” dog food?

Good dog food will contain a high-quality mixture of meat, fruits, vegetables, and grains. It will have also undergone testing by dog specialists to ensure it’s quality and healthfulness.

It seems like almost every dog food brand will claim that theirs is “the best” or the “healthiest”. 

But what actually makes “good” dog food, whether dry or wet, good for your dog?

It needs to have all the nutrients your dog needs to stay healthy. It should contain not only meat, but also grains, fruits, and vegetables. 

Your dog needs not just meat and proteins but also the fiber, vitamins, and minerals in these non-meat foods.

 

Dog nutritional needs

The most basic requirement for choosing a food for your dog is to ensure it meets their nutritional needs.

Dog chewingMost of the commercial dog food brands you find in the store will meet a dog’s minimum nutritional requirements, at least for the average dog.

It is important to note that not every dog will have the same nutritional needs. 

The needs of an adult dog and a puppy will be different. The nutritional needs of small breed dogs and large breed dogs will be different.

We suggest that you do your research, talk with your veterinarian and to not always believe everything you read or hear. There is a lot of misinformation out there, so make sure your source is credible.

One thing you should always check for is that the dog food states on the label that it is “formulated to meet the nutritional levels established by the AAFCO Dog Food Nutrient Profiles.”

This is because the Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) has strict requirements to make sure that pet food products provide complete and balanced nutrition.

Ultimately, it will be up to you to ensure your dog is getting a healthy diet. We hope that you take your responsibility seriously. A healthy diet will benefit both you and your dog for years to come.

 


The Pet’s Home provides in-home pet sitting, dog sitting, cat sittingdog walkingpuppy training and pet taxi services in the Plainfield, Oswego, Aurora, Naperville, Joliet, and Shorewood area.

Contact us online or call (630) 854-8841


How Long Can I Leave My Cat Home Alone?

Cat left home alone

In this post, we answer your question, how long can I leave my cat home alone? Is it one day, two days, three days? Less? More?

We are just like you; we love our cats.

Cats have a reputation for being aloof or solitary but they can have many different personality types. 

Some cats actually love attention and will visit and even set with every human that comes into their house. Others are suspicious of strangers but love their humans.

Because cats can be so independent, it is easy to assume you can leave them home alone, maybe even for a few days at a time.

But is it really true? How long can I leave my cat home alone?

Every cat is different of course, and no one knows their cat better than you. There are some accepted guidelines for how long it is safe or healthy to leave your cat home alone.

 

Leaving a cat alone while at work

Cat restingCats are known for being more low maintenance than dogs, and being able to leave your dog home while you are at work all days is part of that.

Cats don’t need to be let outside so they can go to the bathroom which means you don’t have to rush home the minute work is over to let them out.

You can safely leave your cat at home while you are at work. However, it is a good idea to leave a toy at home with them so they do have some entertainment when they are in the mood for activity. Some people also like to leave a radio on set to classical music or jazz for their cats.

 

Can I leave my cat alone for an entire day and night?

Veterinarians will generally agree that it is okay to leave your cat alone for 24 hours.

Make sure they have plenty of fresh water, a meal, and a clean litterbox and they should be fine.

Consider leaving them a couple of toys to play with while you’re gone and maybe even leaving a radio on for them playing soft music or news/talk radio.

 

Can I leave my cat home alone for a few days? For three days?

A healthy adult cat may be able to stay home alone for 24-48 hours.

Kitten on the bedHow long you can leave your cat alone will depend on your cat, their personality and their habits. Your cat’s age and health also are important factors.

Kittens need more attention than adults and should not be left home alone for more than 4-8 hours. 

Related: When Can I Leave My Kitten Home Alone?

Older cats or cats that have or have had health issues should be checked on more often.

Some older cats can also be extra-sensitive to changes in routine, which can cause them stress, possibly lowering their immunity or triggering other issues.

If you are going to be away from home for more than 48 hours or are worried about your cat being lonely or having health issues, don’t hesitate to hire a cat sitting service to check in on your cat and interact with them.

 

Can I leave my cat home alone for three days?

We do not recommend your cat be left home alone for three days or more. 

Many people will say it is okay to leave a cat home alone for three days or more. Some adult cats may be fine with this and may be able to handle this. However, there are things that could go wrong.

A medical issue can become bad quickly. They may become lonely or stressed. A cat may climb into a place and get stuck somewhere (it wouldn’t be a first.)

We think you should have someone checking on your cat if they are alone for more than 48 hours. You will feel better knowing someone is checking on your furry friend and your cat will enjoy some interaction with another person.

 


Kitten on the bed

The Pet’s Home provides in-home cat sitting, pet sitting, dog sittingdog walkingpuppy training and pet taxi services in the Plainfield, Oswego, Aurora, Naperville, Joliet and Shorewood 

For help with your pet Call: (630) 854-8841


 

 

Peanut Butter and Dogs Warning – Beware of Xylitol

peanut butter warning for dogs - beware of xylitol

In this post, we discuss a warning about not to give your dog peanut butter containing the sugar substitute Xylitol. It can be very dangerous!

We’ve been asked a lot lately if it is still safe to give your dog xylitol. 

There have been stories and images being shared a lot recently on Facebook and social media about how certain kinds of peanut butter can be extremely dangerous to your dog.

This warning caught some people by surprise because they’ve been giving their dog peanut butter as a treat for years and their dog loves it.

Dogs do love peanut butter! It can be a great treat for your furry friend.

However, the warnings are true. Certain types of peanut butter can be dangerous!

 

Xylitol dangerous for dogs

peanut butter on a spoonThe first time some people heard that some peanut butter could be dangerous for dogs, it seemed like a crazy rumor.

It was so hard to believe that fact-checking website Snopes even did an article about the story, proclaiming: Xylitol, a sugar substitute used in sugar-free gum and other products, can be harmful to dogs to be TRUE.

Their article discussed how in April 2015 a Wisconsin family’s 2-year-old golden retriever had died of severe liver damage after consuming gum containing the sweetener Xylitol while the family wasn’t home.

This is just one of many tragic stories about dogs eating food with Xylitol in it. 

Related post: Foods That Are Dangerous For Dogs

 

What is xylitol?

Xylitol is a common artificial sugar substitute sweetener that is in hundreds of products, especially “sugar-free” products.

It can be found in some brands of peanut butter. Xylitol is fine for people, but it’s extremely poisonous to dogs and unfortunately poisons thousands of dogs each year. 

 

Brands of peanut butter that contain xylitol

AVOID THESE BRANDS OF PEANUT BUTTER!

  • Go Nuts, Co.
  • Krush Nutrition
  • Nuts ‘N More
  • P28 
  • No Cow (previously called D’s Naturals)

Read labels and ingredient lists carefully! 

DO NOT assume that “all natural” or “no artificial sweeteners” on the label means that it is safe for your dog. Xylitol is technically considered by the FDA to be an “all natural” sweetener.

Related post: 5 Dangerous Houseplants that are Toxic to Dogs

 

Whining DogBrands of peanut butter that are safe for dogs

  • Peanut Butter & Co (Old Fashioned Smooth)
  • Jif Natural
  • Brad’s Naturals
  • Hank’s
  • Once Again
  • Justin’s
  • Smucker’s

These brands are safe as of April 2019. Please check the label to make sure the ingredients have not changed. 

*In this post we attempt to list safe and unsafe peanut butter brands for dogs. Ingredients may change over time. We cannot be responsible for the health and safety of your pet and keeping this information up to date in real time. 

Original peanut butter photo by PiccoloNamek via English Wikipedia

 


The Pet’s Home provides in-home pet sitting, dog sitting, cat sittingdog walkingpuppy training and pet taxi services in the Plainfield, Oswego, Aurora, Naperville, Joliet, and Shorewood area.

Contact us online or call (630) 854-8841


When Can I Leave My Kitten Home Alone?

Kitten on the bed

In this post, we seek to answer the question for you, when can I leave my kitten home alone? How about overnight? For 24 hours? Four days?

When it comes to cute things, a cute little kitten is definitely going to be at the top of a lot of people’s lists. They’re just so adorable! 

Even though you love your little kitten, you have a life outside of your home and you can’t always be there with it all the time, as much as you’d like to.

That leads to the question:

When is it okay to leave my kitten home alone? 

Little kittens during their first few months require a lot more attention than older cats do. We all know how independent an older cat can be at times.

Kittens are different. They need a lot of socialization, play, and activity during those first few weeks and months.

Like all pets, no two are alike and what works for one is not going to be the same for another. There are some general guidelines you should be aware of.

 

When Can I Leave My Kitten Home Alone?

Kittens need the most attention from the time they are eight weeks old until they are four months old.

In general, kittens aged 2-4 months will benefit from human interaction every 4 to 6 hours.

During this time, you need to spend as much time with them as you can. Of course, you will need to be away at times but try not to be if you can help it. 

In these early weeks of development, you should have someone checking in on them every 4-6 hours if you can be there. Have a human checking in on your kitten during the day while you are at work. 

By the time your kitten is about six months old, they should be able to spend the day alone for eight hours while you are at work.

 

Cat, Kitten, Anxiety, separation anxietyIf I have two kittens can they be left alone?

Actually, two kittens are better than one! They need activity and interaction, so when you have two kittens they can entertain themselves better. 

 

Can I leave my kitten home alone overnight?

Unless your kitten is six months or older, they should not be left home alone overnight. 

As long as they are younger than six months old, they should have someone checking in on them during the night or day if it’s going to be longer than eight hours. If you can’t have a friend or family member do it, you should hire a pet sitter.

 

Can I leave my kitten home alone for 24 hours?

If your kitten is younger than six months old then they should not be left home alone for 24 hours or more.

They should not be left alone for more than 4-6 hours at this age.

You are going to have to come up with some sort of arrangement so that you can have someone checking in on them during the day.

 


Kitten on the bed

The Pet’s Home provides in-home pet sitting, dog sittingcat sittingdog walkingpuppy training and pet taxi services in the Plainfield, Oswego, Aurora, Naperville, Joliet and Shorewood 

For help with your pet Call: (630) 854-8841


 

 

New Years Resolutions for Your Dog and You

Dog New Year Resolutions

In this post, we list some New Years Resolutions for your dog, and for you, to make the new year even better for both of you.

It’s the new year! Have you made New Years Resolutions for yourself?

How about resolutions for your best and most loyal friend?

Your dog wouldn’t mind having a better year either!

Here is a list of ideas to improve your dog’s health and happiness in the new year.

 

New Years Resolutions for your dog (and you)

  • Go to the dog park regularly (or more often)
  • Get a new accessory (collar, leash, sweater) for your dog
  • Brush your dog’s teeth more often
  • Add ten minutes to the length of your walks
  • Learn more about your dog and it’s breed
  • Buy your dog their favorite treat
  • Get rid of old, worn dog toys
  • Make your car trips easier
  • Keep vaccinations up to date
  • Teach your dog a new trick or lesson
  • Make more time for play and snuggling
  • Make a homemade dog treat
  • Help out a local shelter

 

Go to the dog park regularly (or more often)

Do you go to the dog park often or almost never? It wouldn’t be a bad thing for both of you to get out and get a little more fresh air and social time.

Get a new accessory (collar, leash, sweater) for your dog

Did your dog get any new accessories for the holidays? If not, you should get something that will be to the benefit of the both of you, whether it’s a new fancy collar, leash or even a dog sweater. 

Brush your dog’s teeth more often

Most dog owners don’t brush their pet’s teeth enough. It’s okay, that is common. Resolve to brush their teeth more often this year.

Add ten minutes to the length of your walks

You are walking your dog regularly, right? Great! How about you extend the walking time by another ten minutes? You’ll both benefit from the added exercise. Over time, that 10 minutes a day really adds up.

Learn more about your dog and it’s breed

There’s always a little something more to learn about dogs, breeds, and their behaviors. You could learn something that could make your lives easier, healthier, or less stressful.

Dog chewingBuy your dog their favorite treat

It’s the holidays! Your dog deserves a special treat.

Get rid of old, worn dog toys

Time to get rid of any old tattered toys and start fresh.

Make your car trips easier

There are lots of ways to make car travel safer and more enjoyable for your dog and you, including new harnesses, car seats, calming treats, and car seat covers.

Keep vaccinations up to date

Hopefully, you are doing this already and your veterinarian is helping you. But make sure it is done, it really is important.

Teach your dog a new trick or lesson

No matter how the saying goes, you can teach an old dog new tricks. Most will actually enjoy the challenge and reward of doing so. It can make life a little more fun.

Make more time for play and snuggling

Are you too busy or too tired after work for play time? Let’s fix that! Make sure you are setting aside time for play, you will both get so much closer and happier because of it.

Make a homemade dog treat

Is there a favorite treat your dog loves when you make it? Then do it! And if there isn’t, now is the time to learn how to make something new. You’ll feel a sense of accomplishment and your dog will be thrilled.

Help out a local shelter

Almost every local shelter could use some assistance, whether you volunteer, donate, promote, or refer friends and family. Do something to help out the other dogs out there that haven’t found their home yet. You’ll feel great.

 


The Pet’s Home provides in-home pet sitting, dog sitting, cat sittingdog walkingpuppy training and pet taxi services in the Plainfield, Oswego, Aurora, Naperville, Joliet and Shorewood area.

Contact us online or call (630) 854-8841


 

5 Dangerous Houseplants that are Toxic to Dogs

Houseplants Toxic to Dogs

Houseplants have many benefits in the home. They make a home cozier, can be used for medicinal purposes and purify the air. Unfortunately, there are some fairly common houseplants that can be dangerous to your dog. In this post, we will review some houseplants that are toxic to dogs.

Poisoning from these plants can occur in several ways such as:

  • Drinking the water from the plant tray or pot.
  • Eating the leaves, blossoms, roots or even the soil in the pot.
  • Skin contact with any plant sap or juice.

Before you purchase any houseplant protect your canine family member by doing a little bit of research.

Related: Plants That Are Poisonous to Cats

1. Philodendron
Philodendron

Philodendrons are very popular houseplants. They are fast growing, available in climbing and upright varieties and are easy to care for. These plants contain insoluble calcium oxalates which are toxic to animals and humans.

Symptoms of Ingestion: Oral irritation, pain and swelling of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, difficulty swallowing.

2. Pothos or Devils Ivy
Pothos (Devils Ivy)

The Pothos Houseplant has amazing air purification properties and is easy to propagate from cuttings which makes it a very popular houseplant. Though only mildly harmful in small quantities, Pothos also contains insoluble calcium oxalates.

Symptoms of Ingestion: Oral irritation, pain and swelling of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, difficulty swallowing.

3. Peace Lily
Peace Lily

Containing insoluble calcium oxalates like Philodendrons and Pothos houseplants, the Peace Lily can be moderately harmful to your dog.

Symptoms of Ingestion: Drooling, pawing at the mouth, oral pain, decreased appetite, vomiting.

4. Aloe Plant
Aloe Plant

Aloe is a very common household plant due to its medicinal benefits such as purifying the air and is also provides natural burn/sunburn relief. For dogs though this plant should be kept out of reach as it contains saponins and anthraquinones.

Symptoms of Ingestion: Vomiting, abdominal pain, hypersalivation, diarrhea. Foliage is more toxic than berries.

5. Ivy or English Ivy
English Ivy

Ivy is a beautiful accent to your home with the way it cascades from hanging baskets but is very harmful to your pet especially if consumed in large amounts. Beware.

Symptoms of Ingestion: Vomiting, depression, anorexia, changes in urine color, and rarely, tremors.
 
 


If you suspect your pet may have ingested a potentially toxic substance, call the APCC at (888) 426-4435 or contact your local veterinarian as soon as possible.

Sources:
The ASPCA
Pet Poison Helpline


The Pet’s Home provides in-home pet sitting, dog sitting, cat sitting, dog walkingpuppy training andpet taxi services in the Plainfield, Oswego, Aurora, Naperville, Joliet and Shorewood area.

Contact us online or call (630) 854-8841


Cat Myths We Should Put to Rest

Cat resting

In this post, we address the most common of those myths that you hear about cats that are not actually true.

There are many things in the world we believe because we’ve heard them for so long, we assume them to be true. Many myths that people have about pets or animals are repeated so often, we never think to ask if they’re actually true.

Let’s review some common myths about cats and their behavior.

 

Cats are low maintenance

Because cats have a reputation for being so independent and aloof, some people think having a cat will be very easy. Like many pets though, owning one requires your commitment and attention. Cats need to be fed of course, but they also need to be loved, they need to be played with and entertained, and they need our help in getting their needs met. They require our understanding and patience sometimes too. 

 Related: Is Your Cat Bored?

 

Cats won’t be happy if you don’t let them outdoors

Indoor cats can be just as happy as outdoor cats. Cats that grow up inside can be very happy as long as you give them the entertainment they need. Provide them with plenty of toys, scratching posts, window they have access to for outdoor viewing and climbing towers. 

Related: Reasons to Keep Cats Indoors

 

Pregnant woman should not have cats

The truth is that you don’t have to get rid of your cat. It’s fine to be around cats when you’re pregnant, but you have to be VERY careful about cleaning the litter box. It is recommended that you have someone else do it if possible. Cat feces can carry a parasitic infection called toxoplasmosis, that could cause birth defects. Keep the litter box extra clean but the pregnant woman shouldn’t be the one cleaning it.

 

Declawing cats is no different than trimming nails

Declawing is NOT like trimming nails. In reality, it is actually the surgical amputation of the first joint of each toe of the cat. For many people and pet advocates, this procedure is viewed as mutilation of the cat. There are humane alternatives to declawing you can choose instead.

 


The Pet’s Home provides in-home pet sitting, dog sitting, cat sittingdog walkingpuppy training and pet taxi services in the Plainfield, Oswego, Naperville and Shorewood area. 

Contact us online or call (630) 854-8841